Sustainable practices in art-making: an interview with Miguel Sbastida

Two totems made of bricks and site-specific materials. They look like two piles of bricks and rocks of different colors with a picture of geological formations on top of each pile.
Technofossils of the Anthropocene — partial view of the installation. (2018-ongoing). “Between 1920 and 1970, the metallurgic industry Altos Hornos de Vizcaya dumped into the Cantabric Sea more than 30.000.000 tonnes of industrial waste. Technofossils of the Anthropocene traces the history of these industrial residues that slowly — and with the aid of the ocean — transform into post-natural and geological objects.” 140 x 60 cm
Four cuttings from magazines, a map and a rock hanging on a wall.
Technofossils of the Anthropocene — partial view of the installation. (2018-ongoing). “All components of the project are entangled to each other and develop a systemic structure, in which some provide context for the rest, cross-pollinating, generating complexities and associations between its different materialities and their specific viewpoints.” 95 x 72 x 15 cm
Two sculptures that replicate the space left inside the hand’s palm when it closes.
Technofossils of the Anthropocene — partial view of the installation. (2018-ongoing). “Two sculptures made from site-specific sediments that reference the space left inside the hand’s palm when it closes.”
Ten columns of pale blue glass of diffrent heights.
Archaeologies of Climate (2017–2019) — partial view of the installation. “An installation made of solid glass columns that are inspired in glacial deposits and the drilling of ice cores as archaeological artifacts of climate change. In some ways, glacial ice-cores are the worst of our ruins: vestiges of a climatological past which doesn’t only look back in time, but which disappearance determines the future of our planet.”
A graph painted on a white wall. The line that traces the carbon dioxide density spikes drastically towards the end of the graph.
Archaeologies of Climate (2017–2019) — partial view of the installation. A wall drawing featuring atmospheric carbon dioxide density fluctuations over the last 800.000 years.
The entrance of a cave-like formation in a glacier with sheets of paper painted blue disseminated on the ground.
Slow Violence (2018) “A site-responsive intervention in which a glacier documents its own extinction.By strategically placing blue-tinted sheets of paper underneath melting areas of the glacier, the ice mapped its slow but steady disappearance. The unstopping, yet constant dripping of meltwater slowly washed away the blue pigment; creating images that are not only made by the agency of the glacier in itself, but which contain its own history.”
28 abstract paintings with different hues of blue, arranged in 4 raws of 7.
Slow Violence (2018) —Resulting paintings. 55 x 38 cm each

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